UPDATE from Ontario Film Office Los Angeles Rep – August 24, 2018

In these dog days of summer it appears headline writers are pausing to catch their breath after several tumultuous months recording historic consolidation and breathtaking investment in content.

 

Georgia is one of the chief beneficiaries of a seemingly ever-expanding production universe. The Atlanta Journal Constitution this week reported that the state invested $800 million in tax credits last year, in 455 productions, which produced $2.7 billion in direct spending in the state.

https://www.ajc.com/blog/radiotvtalk/another-record-breaking-year-for-georgia-film-and-455-productions-billion-direct-spending/lWsXHKRljoebL2I09KAwqO/

 

Film and television tax credits in Illinois were the subject of scrutiny by the Chicago Sun Times this week. The article below notes that the state spent $420 million in tax credits last year and asserts that politicians have not detailed or properly audited the program.

https://chicago.suntimes.com/news/illinois-gives-millions-state-tax-breaks-tv-film-productions-transparency-chicago-fire-transformers-mob-wives-watchdogs/

 

The trades all reported the news that this year’s Toronto International Film Festival will host a women’s rally, Deadline‘s take on it is below.

https://deadline.com/2018/08/womens-rally-toronto-film-festival-share-her-journey-rally-1202449145/

 

Hollywood is still processing the changes to next year’s Academy Awards which were announced last week. The CBC spoke to some prominent Canadian Academy members –  including Best Picture Winner Miles Dale (The Shape of Water) – about their thoughts.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/entertainment/canadian-academy-members-talk-changes-1.4782076

 

Finally this week, the CBC also featured a good news story regarding how streaming services like Netflix have helped fuel production industry growth in Ontario. As detailed below,  the film and TV industry in Ontario now creates 32,000 jobs a year, adding $1.6 billion to the economy.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/streaming-services-like-netflix-fuel-exponential-production-surge-in-ontario-1.4788488